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Goldenstein Art Gallery, Sedona

Lee Mitchelson

Nursery Duty by Lee Mitchelson
Nursery Duty

artists BIO

Lee Mitchelson

Lee is a member of Oil Painters of America
Lee's paintings will be in Southwest Art Magazine's Annual Collector's Guide 2018-1019
Currently, Lee is participating in the continuous invitational traveling exhibit of "Facing the Wind" a public education presentation about our wild horses and burros on public land. Curated by Wind Dancer Foundation.
Her larger equine oil paintings are represented exclusively by Goldenstein Art.
Lee Mitchelson's animal art is collected in 10 countries and is in the permanent collection of the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural history and two libraries.
She was personally selected by world reknown horse photographer and writer, Robert Vavra, to illustrate two of his books, The Unicorn of Kilimanjaro and Vavra's Horses
Among those who own her animal art are William Shatner, Robert Vavra, Barnaby Conrad, The DuPont Family, The Estates of Betty Ford, James A. Michener, Cleveland Amory, Elmer Bernstein, and more.
"I came into this world attached spirit to spirit, with animals. The evolution to drawing and painting them, came when I discovered my obsession with art materials. It was an awakening, I started drawing and painting animals as though they flowed right out of my hands and onto paper or canvas.  
If a person is born with some ability, it is a stewardship that comes with responsibilities.  I have done probably a thousand commissioned paintings of beloved animals. The bond between people and their animals is profound, the magnitude of it can barely be encompassed in words. It is as huge as the universe and equally infinite.  So, when I have the opportunity to paint an animal that is loved by someone, I do it with empathy for all the unspoken words and realities that may be within that relationship, present or past.
All of the same sensitivities apply to doing horse paintings to hang in a gallery, destined to become part of someone's environment in their home or office.  I am painting things I love, and having had horses for more than 50 years, I know them very well.  All horses are my concern, whether wild or domestic.  And I do consider the bands of horses running on our public lands, to be wild. The herds began as escaped horses hundreds of years ago but have been wild ever since.  They are not to be dismissed as 'feral', without the protections afforded wildlife. We have much to accomplish towards that end. As it stands right now, wild horses like the ones in my paintings, are in constant danger of being gathered and eradicated.  This weighs heavily on me, always.
I paint wild horses that are part of family bands, or domestic horses enjoying life, and I paint horses that have bonded with a person and that are part of a timeless story of partnership between horses and people.   I do not paint horses or any animal that is under duress. No fighting stallions, no exhausted buggy horses, no artificial enhancements.  I paint the world the way I would like it to always be for animals."
Lee Mitchelson is a full-time artist living and painting in Arizona, and her place is home to her Star View Lifetime Sanctuary for senior and special-needs animals in need of a place to live out their lives in peace.