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Goldenstein Art Gallery, Sedona

Star York

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Autumn Harvest by Star York
Autumn Harvest

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Star York

Star Liana York grew up in Maryland, daughter of a professional ballerina and a talented woodworker. Always displaying a strong affinity for animals as a child, Star Liana York purchased her first horse as a teenager and began competing in speed events and rodeos. York operated a horse boarding and training business through college (graduating from the University of Maryland in Studio Art) but always dreamed of coming out West. This dream was realized 20 years ago.

Only two years after arriving in the Southwest, Star Liana York was gaining recognition at art competitions enough for South West Art Magazine to do an article on her work. Her sculpture has been on the cover of many magazines including Southwest Art & Art Talk. Star Liana York was chosen as one of the 30 most influential artists in Southwest Art’s 30 years’ issue. Several museums have her sculpture in their collections, and in 1999 she was given a one-woman show at the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Star Liana York resides with her husband, Jeff Brock on their horse ranch. Their shared passions are raising quarter horses and creating art. Star Liana York feels that working with the horses and sculpting make for the right balance in her life, both disciplines require a creative approach, sensitivity and patience to be successful. Star Liana York strives to remain open to many unique aspects the region has to offer. “The Southwest is blessed with such rich cultural, aesthetic, and spiritual complexities that inspiration is always at hand. The colorful heritage of the Native American people and the ranching communities present timeless themes and subjects. My goal is to capture in bronze the universal humanity reflected in the gesture of a caring shepherd girl, the sleepy grin of a bobcat or the playfulness of a pregnant mare. These subtleties of character, personality, and expression are the most challenging and most rewarding part of my art.”