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Goldenstein Art Gallery, Sedona

Upton Ethelbah

Anasazi Spirit Bear by Upton Ethelbah
Anasazi Spirit Bear
Anasazi Tsideh (Parrot) by Upton Ethelbah
Anasazi Tsideh (Parrot)
Antelope Dancer by Upton Ethelbah
Antelope Dancer
Apache by Upton Ethelbah
Apache
Apache Crown Dancer by Upton Ethelbah
Apache Crown Dancer
Apache Mountain Spirit by Upton Ethelbah
Apache Mountain Spirit
Apache Mountain Spirit II by Upton Ethelbah
Apache Mountain Spirit II
Basket Dancer by Upton Ethelbah
Basket Dancer
Blue Corn by Upton Ethelbah
Blue Corn
Buffalo Dancer by Upton Ethelbah
Buffalo Dancer
Corn Maiden by Upton Ethelbah
Corn Maiden
Corn Maiden's Prayer II by Upton Ethelbah
Corn Maiden's Prayer II
Corn Maiden's Prayer III by Upton Ethelbah
Corn Maiden's Prayer III
Corn Maidens Prayer by Upton Ethelbah
Corn Maidens Prayer
Corn Sisters by Upton Ethelbah
Corn Sisters
Eagle Dancer by Upton Ethelbah
Eagle Dancer
Gaan Dancer by Upton Ethelbah
Gaan Dancer
Gifts from the Rain Mother by Upton Ethelbah
Gifts from the Rain Mother
Harvest Dancer by Upton Ethelbah
Harvest Dancer
Kiva Man and Kiva Woman (Pair) by Upton Ethelbah
Kiva Man and Kiva Woman (Pair)
Kiva Woman II by Upton Ethelbah
Kiva Woman II
Like Mother, Like Daughter by Upton Ethelbah
Like Mother, Like Daughter
Little Sunshine by Upton Ethelbah
Little Sunshine
Matachina I by Upton Ethelbah
Matachina I
Medicine Bear with Heartline by Upton Ethelbah
Medicine Bear with Heartline
Medicine Bear- Colorado Marble by Upton Ethelbah
Medicine Bear- Colorado Marble
Peyote Bird by Upton Ethelbah
Peyote Bird
Phantasia (Bird & Egg) by Upton Ethelbah
Phantasia (Bird & Egg)
Pueblo Corn Dancer II by Upton Ethelbah
Pueblo Corn Dancer II
Rainbow Dancer II by Upton Ethelbah
Rainbow Dancer II
Sedona Medicine Bear by Upton Ethelbah
Sedona Medicine Bear
Shalako II by Upton Ethelbah
Shalako II
Shalako III by Upton Ethelbah
Shalako III
Small Kokopelli by Upton Ethelbah
Small Kokopelli
Spirit of the Bear by Upton Ethelbah
Spirit of the Bear
Stone Bear- Utah Honeycomb Calcite by Upton Ethelbah
Stone Bear- Utah Honeycomb Calcite
Stone Bear- Utah Peach Alabaster by Upton Ethelbah
Stone Bear- Utah Peach Alabaster
Stone Bear- Utah Raspberry Alabaster by Upton Ethelbah
Stone Bear- Utah Raspberry Alabaster
Tewa Butterfly by Upton Ethelbah
Tewa Butterfly
Tewa Legacy by Upton Ethelbah
Tewa Legacy
The Blessing by Upton Ethelbah
The Blessing
Vespers by Upton Ethelbah
Vespers

artists BIO

Upton Ethelbah

‘The Stone Speaks To Me and Tells Me What It Wants To Be’
Upton Ethelbah, Jr. (Apache/Santa Clara Pueblo) continues to serve notice of his arrival on the Southwest art scene. Ethelbah’s award-winning sculptures have launched him to the top of collectors’ lists world-wide. Best in Bronze Sculpture 2006 Santa Fe Indian Market, Named 2009 Living Treasure by the Museum of Arts & Culture Santa Fe NM, Best in Stone Sculpture 2009 Santa Fe Indian Market.

Ethelbah was born to a White Mountain Apache father (loosely translated, Ethelbah means Greyshoes in the Apache language) and a Santa Clara Pueblo mother. Raised with the ceremonies and arts of two proud cultures, the artist’s early careers nevertheless took him away from his traditions.

After graduating from the University of New Mexico in 1971, he embarked on a career in education and social work. Ethelbah served under three important institutions in New Mexico: the State Department of Education, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the All Indian Pueblo Council. Under the Council, he served as the director of student living at Santa Fe Indian School for 14 years, until his retirement in 1998.

Greyshoes’ first bronze, “Pueblo Corn Dancer” taken from a mold of a soapstone and marble piece, won first place at the Indian and Spanish Art Market in Colorado Springs and third place at the Santa Fe Indian Market.

Another bronze, “Song of the Corn Dance”, took a first place at the Sharlot Hall Museum show in Prescott, Arizona. At Santa Fe Indian Market in 2004, “Shalako” was to receive recognition and in 2005 he repeated receiving honors for the enlargement of “Shalako". Ethelbah’s diverse vocabulary of three dimensional themes is inspired by a strong connection to his mother’s and father’s people, respectively. Contemporary interpretations of his native Southwest Indian culture project a distinctly clean, clear voice, while vibrant patinas are his hallmark.